dc.contributor.author Marshall, R
dc.contributor.author Sharma, P
dc.contributor.author Sivakumaran, B
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-27T22:05:56Z
dc.date.available 2012-01-27T22:05:56Z
dc.date.copyright 2006
dc.date.issued 2012-01-28
dc.identifier.citation Advances in Consumer Research, vol.33 pp.388 - 389
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10292/3316
dc.description.abstract Although impulse buying (IB) and variety seeking (VS) are both low-effort feelings-based behaviors with similar underlying psycho-social processes, there is no general theory to explain such hedonic purchase behaviors. This paper explores similarities and differences between these behaviors using a conceptual framework incorporating three relevant consumer traits – consumer impulsiveness, optimum stimulation level and self-monitoring. The findings from two studies across student and retail customer samples, show that consumer impulsiveness and optimum stimulation level influence both behaviors positively, whereas self-monitoring influences IB negatively and VS positively. Self-monitoring also moderates the influence of consumer impulsiveness and optimum stimulation level on purchase decisions, negatively for IB and positively for VS.
dc.publisher Association for Consumer Research
dc.publisher AUT University
dc.relation.uri http://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/display.asp?id=12482
dc.rights ACR is not the publisher or author of any works posted on the Forum. It is a passive service for storage and dissemination of the works that ACR members may choose to post and distribute via the Forum. ACR does not screen works before they are posted, and no prior approval is required for posting. ACR disclaims all copyright and ownership in such works and all responsibility for them.
dc.subject No keywords
dc.title Investigating impulse buying and variety seeking: towards a general theory of Hedonic Purchase Behaviors
dc.type Journal Article
dc.rights.accessrights OpenAccess

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