dc.contributor.author Robie, D
dc.date.accessioned 2011-12-19T04:06:18Z
dc.date.available 2011-12-19T04:06:18Z
dc.date.copyright 2011-05
dc.date.issued 2011-12-19
dc.identifier.citation Pacific Journalism Review, vol. 17(1) pp. 5 - 9.
dc.identifier.issn 1023-9499
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10292/3197
dc.description.abstract Journalists need to be highly committed and determined when pursuing an issue in an investigative way because they inevitably will be confronted with considerable pressures. These pressures include resistance from publishers and editors due to time and resource constraints, threats from those under scrutiny and legal and contractual complications after publication or broadcast. Investigative journalists, particularly in New Zealand and the Pacific, where investigative journalism is in decline, risk being isolated when attempting vigorous Fourth Estate-styled reportage.
dc.format.medium Research journal
dc.language English
dc.publisher Creative Industries Research Institute
dc.publisher AUT University
dc.relation.uri http://www.pjreview.info/articles/editorial-reinventing-muckraking-387
dc.rights Auckland University of Technology (AUT) encourages public access to AUT information and supports the legal use of copyright material in accordance with the Copyright Act 1994 (the Act) and the Privacy Act 1993. Unless otherwise stated, copyright material contained on this site may be in the intellectual property of AUT, a member of staff or third parties. Any commercial exploitation of this material is expressly prohibited without the written permission of the owner.
dc.subject Investigative journalism; Photojournalism; Corporate interference; Legal restrictions; Environmental journalism; Whistleblowing; Peace journalism;
dc.title Reinventing muckraking [Editorial]
dc.type Other form of assessable output
dc.rights.accessrights OpenAccess

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