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dc.contributor.authorWright St Clair, V
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-13T20:05:24Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-13T23:19:24Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-16T07:49:21Z
dc.date.available2011-10-13T20:05:24Z
dc.date.available2011-10-13T23:19:24Z
dc.date.available2011-10-16T07:49:21Z
dc.date.copyright2009-08-30
dc.date.issued2011-10-14
dc.identifier.citationVerbal presentation at the International Conference for Ageing and Spirituality, Auckland
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/2328
dc.description.abstractThe human entity‟s co-existence in the world is fundamental to an ontological interpretation of the meaning of being (Heidegger, 1927/1962). Accordingly, being-in-the-world is always a mode of „Being-with-Others.‟ Even when not in the company of others, Being-in-the-world always has a relational quality. It implies a person is never fully „alone‟ in the world. Others are always „there‟ in a contextual way. Such understandings of Being-with will be influenced by a peoples‟ world view. This paper shares three stories told by Maori elders within the context of a hermeneutic phenomenological study undertaken on Auckland‟s North Shore. Each story illuminates something of the spiritual meanings of being aged and being Maori. The study itself aimed to understand the meaning of „being aged‟ through the everyday experiences of those who live in advanced age. Individual research conversations were conducted with fifteen community-dwelling elders; four Maori aged 71 to 93 and eleven non-Maori aged 80 to 97 years. The research conversations were focused on gathering the stories of particular everyday events as well as the person‟s reflections on aging. As a non-Maori researcher, cultural integrity of the text and the interpretations was enhanced through partnership with a Maori advisor. In this paper, the spiritual dimension of the everyday experiences of elder Maori are revealed as being-with as belonging, being-with as elder, and contributing to community.
dc.publisherThe Selwyn Foundation - Selwyn Centre for Ageing and spirituality
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/2282
dc.relation.replaces10292/2282
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/2307
dc.relation.replaces10292/2307
dc.relation.urihttp://www.selwyncare.org.nz/Resources/library/PDFs/SCAS/Wright-St-Clair__Valerie_-_Presentation.pdf
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in (see Citation). The original publication is available at (see Publisher's Version).
dc.titleThe Meaning of Being Aged and Being Maori
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.identifier.roid14496en_NZ


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