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dc.date.accessioned2018-10-31T03:01:12Z
dc.date.available2018-10-31T03:01:12Z
dc.date.copyright2018-04-21en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(4):816.
dc.identifier.issn1661-7827en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/11922
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated how two public spaces for sport and recreation were utilized by different user groups, and how this aligned with the initial design objectives for these spaces. Two newly built urban spaces situated in Copenhagen, Denmark, provided the context for this investigation. The System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) was used to examine the physical activity of users in these two urban spaces. The architects responsible for designing each space were interviewed to ascertain the intended target group of each space and to unravel the reasons behind the design decisions. The SOPARC observations revealed that males were more vigorously active than females when using the recreation facilities, and the observed users did not align with the intended target groups. The interviews suggested that design decisions were based on minimal interdisciplinary knowledge, and that expert knowledge was chosen randomly. These findings point to a systematic lack of evidence-based practice when designing sport and recreational facilities. This article has implications for landscape architects and urban planners; a new method must be developed to embed interdisciplinary knowledge in the planning process of future sport and recreation projects. This must be done in a systematic way to make the design process transparent.en_NZ
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.relation.urihttps://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/15/4/816
dc.rightsThis is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
dc.subjectActivating architecture; Physical activity; Transparent design; Evidence based design; Interdisciplinary collaboration; SOPARC
dc.titleDesign of Urban Public Spaces: Intent Vs. Realityen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph15040816en_NZ
dark.contributor.authorHjort, Men_NZ
dark.contributor.authorMartin, WMen_NZ
dark.contributor.authorStewart, Ten_NZ
dark.contributor.authorTroelsen, Jen_NZ
aut.relation.issue4en_NZ
aut.relation.volume15en_NZ
pubs.elements-id336232
aut.relation.journalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen_NZ


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